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Travis Hartman

of The Boxing Amusement Park

THE FIGHTER'S DIARY

 

Travis Hartman was a spectacular amateur boxer -- 156-13, with three national championships -- who has struggled as a pro. The 26-year-old, who hails from the small town of Osborn, Missouri, is still an active fighter who maintains a passion for the sport that has consumed him since his childhood.  Hartman's training journal reflects his physical, psychological and emotional struggle as he continues his an ongoing quest to become the best.

 

 

 

 

After a superb amateur career, the fighter evaluates why his pro experience has been so very different

 

Feb. 12, 2009

No excuses. All the blame lies solely within me ó the fighter. Since turning pro after a very impressive amateur career, I have had a less-than-stellar (at best) professional career up to this point.

On my way home from our gym today, I really had a small epiphany. I know that I've had some very terrible things happen to me in the ring as a pro ó things that were literally out of my hands in some instances ó resulting in me losing. (I'll share some of those stories in my next blog.) My epiphany was that maybe it's finally time, at age 25, to fully engorge myself in becoming the true professional I know I am.

I have been boxing since I was six years old and can honestly say that I've not once given it my all since being a professional boxer. Sadly enough, I feel like I've dishonored the sport, my family, and God for giving me such a talent, and misusing it the way I have.

Not every person is born to be a professional boxer. Some may masquerade as a fighter, but over a long period of time they'll eventually be exposed as frauds. Professional boxing should be nicknamed "the truth" because that squared circle brings out the truth in all of us. Whether you like it or not, the ring will bring it out of you. The only truth I've figured out is that I have not been true to the sport, and all of its fans. Godís own lie detector discovers all inside that ring.

Donít let the sport define you. Define the sport and leave your tracks all over it.

 

 

 

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