Gerald McClellan

Painting by Richard T. Slone

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
 
Statistics
Real name

Gerald McClellan

Nickname(s)

The G-Man

Rated at

Middleweight

Nationality

Flag of the United States

Birth date

October 23, 1967 (1967-10-23) (age 40)

Birth place

Freeport, Illinois

Death date

-

Stance

Orthodox

Boxing record
Total fights

34

Wins

31

Wins by KO

29

Losses

3

Draws

0

No contests

0

Gerald McClellan (born October 23, 1967, in Freeport, Illinois) is a former boxer from the United States of America, who was world middleweight champion. McClellan's record as a professional boxer was 31 wins and 3 losses with 29 wins by knockout.

 Boxing career

McClellan became a professional boxer in 1988. Trained by hall of fame trainer Emanuel Steward, he captured the WBO world middleweight championship knocking out John Mugabi in one round in 1991, and the WBC's version by knocking out Julian Jackson in five rounds in 1993. He defended the WBC title three times.

 Bout with Benn

After his middleweight reign, McClellan went up in weight to challenge world Super-Middleweight champion Nigel Benn in London on February 25, 1995. The fight was watched by an estimated 17 million people on television and 10,300 paying spectators.[1]

McClellan dropped Benn, who went out of the ring in round one. They continued battling, but the fight had a devastating ending. McClellan, after dropping Benn again in round eight, took a knee in round ten. He was counted out and collapsed in his corner.

 Aftermath

McClellan had emergency surgery to remove a bloodclot from his brain. He spent weeks in a coma and once regaining consciousness was found to have suffered extensive brain damage. He lost his eyesight, the ability to walk unassisted and became 80 percent deaf. Sports Illustrated ran an article about the fight and its outcome one week after the fight. McClellan's family flew to be by his side, and later he was flown back to his home country. He has recently recovered some ability to walk, being helped by a cane, but he has not recovered his eyesight. In addition to being blind and almost deaf, his short-term memory was also profoundly affected. His three sisters, particularly Lisa McClellan, are responsible for his care. He has been the honoree at numerous banquets and award ceremonies, and fellow boxing world champion Roy Jones Jr., often pointed as a possible rival during the 1990s, set up a foundation to help McClellan. Nigel Benn himself has also helped to raise funds for McClellan's treatment, and the two men would meet again for the first time since their bout at a fundraiser held in London on February 24th, 2007. Several items were auctioned off at the event and a total of $175,000 was raised. [2]

 Book

The bout was the subject of a book in 2001, written by boxing author Kevin Mitchell titled War, Baby: The Glamour of Violence. In Mitchells words the book is

"the story of what brought these two men together on the night of 25 February 1995 and how that night changed them for ever. It's a story too about those associated with the promotion of public fist-fighting, who bend morality to suit their needs. It's a story that attempts to unravel the glamour of violence".

The book was a finalist in the William Hill Sports Book of the Year category.

Preceded by
Chris Eubank
Vacated
WBO Middleweight Champion
November 20, 1991– 1992
Succeeded by
Vacancy filled by
Chris Pyatt
Preceded by
Julian Jackson
WBC Middleweight Champion
May 8, 1993 May 7, 1994
Succeeded by
Vacancy filled by
Julian Jackson

A Decade Later. The Gerald McClellan Tragedy
By RICHARD SLONE

February 19 , 2005 -February 25th will mark a decade. The tenth year that former middleweight champion Gerald McClellan has struggled with life since his fight with Nigel Benn left Gerald with permanent brain damage.

It’s been a decade since McClellan and Benn battered each other close to death. McClellan has been under the constant care of his two sisters, Lisa and Sandra, since. The war of 1995 left him blind, partially deaf and unable to care for himself.

Gerald is completely blind, his eyes are healthy but the signal to his brain is on a short circuit and his brain has trouble recognizing sounds. His brain injury also caused short-term memory loss. His sense of humor is still intact, as is his will to make the most of everyday. His compassion is also intact, the once fearsome brawler cried when he learned Roy Jones got knocked out.

Gerald lived his young life as a lion, and in that I mean he ruled his domain, he was invincible for a few years and lived life to the fullest. As someone once told me, "It's better to live just one day as a lion, then a lifetime as a lamb." Gerald McClellan knew what it was like to be the lion.

Boxing is a brutal sport, and the combatants know it, shortly before his battle with Benn, McClellan told the press that he was willing to die in the ring instead of losing. Gerald was a warrior to the fullest extent, he lived by the sword and was willing to die by the sword – the sport he loved built him up and then tore him down.

Today, his bank account is empty, medical bills took all of that and he’s supported by his sisters who have dedicated their lives to the care of the G-Man. His sisters work multiple jobs to make ends meet. The promoters, managers, entourage and business partners are all gone, when the money left, so did they. When the McClellans reached out for financial help, few even returned calls.

“Fighters, fans and promoters should all help Gerald” said former heavyweight great Smokin’ Joe Frazier, who once drove 13 hours through snow to attend a fundraiser for Gerald. “In the boxing business, you can get your brain’s shook, your money took and your name in the undertakers book. It’s time people pull together for Gerald.”

Gerald lived his life as a lion, but now he's the lamb, fortunately he has his sister to shepherd him through the rest of his life.

PLEDGE TO HELP GERALD McCLELLAN NOW...AND GET A LIMITED EDITION ART PRINT!

Donate to help Gerald McClellan now and receive a signed limited edition art print of Gerald McClellan in his prime.

The print, painted by Hall of Fame artist Richard T. Slone, measures 16 inches by 20 inches (approx. 50.8cm x 40.6cm) and is available in a limited quantity of only 500 worldwide for a onetime donation of $50 or more to the Gerald McClellan Trust Fund.

All supporters who pledge to help Gerald McClellan by donating $50 or more will receive this magnificent limited edition art print. Checks and money orders should be made payable to: Gerald McClellan Trust Fund and mailed to:

Gerald McClellan Trust
C/O Fifth Third Bank
PO Box 120
Freeport, IL 61032

SEE BELOW TO VIEW PRINT AND MAKE A DONATION


McClellan Limited Edition Art Print now available

April 20, 2003 - Beginning this month, boxing fans are now able to purchase a limited edition art print that immortalizes fallen champ Gerald McClellan.

The print, painted by Hall of Fame artist Richard T. Slone, measures 16 inches by 20 inches (approx. 50.8cm x 40.6cm) and is available in a limited quantity of only 500 worldwide for a onetime donation of $50 or more to the
Gerald McClellan Trust Fund.

Slone, an internationally acclaimed artist, has painted many celebrity clients. Muhammad Ali, Nelson Mandela, Hugh Hefner and Donald Trump are just some of the prominent names that own Slone's original artwork.

Slone has been a friend of McClellan's for well over a decade and was in his corner the night Gerald won his first world championship in 1991 at the Royal Albert Hall in London, England. An ex-boxer and current boxing executive, Slone is also the Official Artist of the International Boxing Hall of Fame. His work has graced the covers of many boxing magazines, including KO Magazine and Ring Magazine.


Limited Edition
Just 500 magnificent fine art prints of Gerald McClellan taken from Hall of Fame artist's Richard T. Slone's original painting, which hangs in the home of the G-Man.

Signed and Numbered
Each print is personally signed and numbered by the artist Richard T. Slone.

Helping Gerald
100% of the money raised by this limited edition art print will go to Gerald McClellan and will help aid his medical bills and living expenses.

How to buy
The beautiful art print will be sent to the first 500 people donating a minimum of $50 to
Gerald McClellan's Trust fund.

 

All supporters who pledge to help Gerald McClellan by donating $50 or more will receive this magnificent limited edition art print. Checks and money orders should be made payable to: Gerald McClellan Trust Fund and mailed to:
 

Gerald McClellan Trust
C/O Fifth Third Bank
PO Box 120
Freeport, IL
61032


To make a Secure credit card purchase/donation via PayPal, click below.